Law, Gov't & Politics / Commentary

Ted Cruz, Sex Toys, and the Constitution

Ted Cruz, Sex Toys, and the Constitution
Birth Control - Fourteenth Amendment To The United States Constitution - New York - Samesex Marriage - Sex Toy - Supreme Court Of The United States - Ted Cruz - Texas - United States Constitution - United States Senate
September 14
15:042017

Gage Skidmore / Flickr.comIn 2007 Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz urged the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit to reject a constitutional challenge to the state's ban on the sale of sex toys. "There is no substantive-due-process right to stimulate one's genitals for non-medical purposes unrelated to procreation or outside of an interpersonal relationship," Cruz and his office argued. The 5th Circuit disagreed and struck down the sex toy ban.
Yesterday on CNN, Cruz was asked about that case. "I spent five and a half years as the solicitor general in Texas. I worked for the attorney general. The attorney general's job is to defend the laws passed by the Texas legislature," he told host Dana Bash.
"One of those laws was a law restricting the sale of sex toys. A stupid law. Listen, I am one of the most libertarian members of the Senate. I think it is idiotic....I am saying that consenting adults should be able to do whatever they want in their those comments mean that Cruz now thinks that Texas took the wrong legal position in the case? Does he think that the 5th Circuit got it right when it struck down the sex toy ban? Not necessarily.
The underlying question in the case was whether federal courts can use the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment—which says that states may not deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process of law—to invalidate a duly enacted state regulation.
That underlying question has been the driving force behind some of the biggest cases in American constitutional law. In 1905, for example, the Supreme Court was asked whether a New York law forbidding bakery employees from working more than 10 hours a day or 60 hours a week violated the Due Process Clause. The Court ruled that it did and struck down the offending provision in Lochner v. New York.
Likewise, in 1965 the Supreme Court was asked whether a Connecticut law that forbid the distribution of birth control devices to married couples violated the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment. The Court ruled that it did and struck down the offending provision in Griswold v. Connecticut.
Which brings us back to Ted Cruz. Two years ago—long after he stopped being professionally obliged to defend the laws of Texas—Cruz derided both Lochner and Griswold as "judicial activism," saying they demonstrated the Supreme Court's "long descent into lawlessness" and its "imperial" misuse of the 14th Amendment.

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